Eric DAUDE
Eric DAUDE
Senior Researcher (CNRS)
Head of the Risks and Territorial Dynamics Research Area
2012 - present
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About

Eric Daudé is CNRS researcher since 2007 after having taught for four years as assistant professor in Geography at the University of Rouen. He is at the CSH in New-Delhi since 2012. He works on spatial diffusion processes and agent-based modeling in the domains of health (epidemics diffusion) and technological / environmental risks.
Eric Daudé is
- Head of
MAGEO project(ANR-FEDER):https://sites.google.com/site/mageosim/
MOSAIIC project(GRR SER): http://mag.hypotheses.org/mosaiic

- Involved in
AEDESS (ANR): http://anr-aedess.fr/
DENFREE projects(FP7) http://www.denfree.eu/ headed by Pasteur Institut
GENSTAR (ANR) headed by IRD.
Population growth, urbanization, water access, education and environmental conditions contribute to defining health issues. The spread of communicable diseases is one of these issues in urban areas. Vector-borne diseases cause a significant fraction of morbidity and mortality rates in the world. Dengue is one of these diseases, its virus transmitted to humans by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Mainly present in urban areas of the tropics, it has been recently observed on the frontiers of Europe. Climate warming and adaptive mosquito behavior seems to be key factors to explain this increase in the area of extension.
Aedes aegypti has been invariably found to be associated with these outbreaks in Delhi and Bangkok. Overhead and ground level tanks, evaporation coolers and tires or pots have repeatedly been reported as key containers harbouring Aedes. This imposes the description of the local environment using geographical information systems and remote sensing. However, the low dispersal rate of the mosquito suggests that humans themselves are dispersing the virus at the city level,a hypothesis which must be confirmed by field studies.

Our team studies the spatio-temporal diffusion of dengue in Delhi and Bangkok based on surveillance data and socio-epidemiological surveys. The team will also develop geosimulation models of both human behaviors and mosquito dynamics in order to test scenarios of dengue control. These models should provide new insights on dengue transmission patterns and will be used as a decision support tool with local partners of the projects in Delhi (Municipal Corporation of Delhi) and Bangkok (Bangkok Metropolitan Administration).
Risks and Territorial Dynamics